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Wowee!!! That is both the largest and most spectacular trifle I've ever seen! Alas, my husband hates trifle so I'll never have the opportunity to make one (its not really worth making an indivual one). Hope the party guests enjoyed it!!

That looks absolutely AMAZING!! Wauw! I'd definetly have bought the glass bowl as well - isn't one of the purposes of busying oneself in the kitchen for several days that you get to buy gadgets and one-purpose-only things - aside from the fact that we love it?!?

*wow*. what they said!

Wow. I'm impressed. I have been thinking about making a trifle for my December wedding and this recipe is perfect! Can I filch it, do you think? And the fact that it takes two days and has to be chilled over night -- PERFECT! Because I can do it all ahead of time. YAY! Thanks for posting this recipe for IMBB!

There were about 20-25 guests, and about 80% of it vanished. Pretty darn good considering there were a few guests on on low-carb diets. We host around 80 people at our potluck Holiday Parties, and the trifle vanishes within the first few hours. That's pretty fast considering both its size and the number of dishes people can choose from. I used to have left-overs, but now it's one of the first dishes gone.

Jennifer: Oh yes, have fun with it. I hope the recipe works as well for you as it has for me.

I'm a bit concerned about this part:

4) With one hand pressing gently on the top of the cake, slide a sharp serrated knife into the cat

What do I do next?

First, don't call me. Take the cat to an emergency animal hospital. Then, finish cutting the cake. Remember to wash your hands first.

(typo fixed. thanks.)

Wow. What a gorgeous dish! I've never even heard of a trifle before, and now I want one, now, now! Thanks for sharing.

This looks great! A trifle has always seemed like so much work, but I think I am officially convinced - yours was beautiful! Don't be surprised if you see a post on my blog in the near future!

Elise: I just did a quick web search and discovered that trifles have a history going back hundreds of years! Who knew! (not me) I suppose a purist would consider my trifle bowl too deep. But, hey, I like it.

Irene: I always go into making this trifle "a bit grumpy" because I know it's going to take so much time, but the end result really is worth it. It's such a stunning, decadent dessert, both in appearance and in taste.

[Speechless]....I want to sink my whole face in that bowl of trifle...mik

Oh. My. Word.

I have childhood memories of really not liking trifle much. It was always too full of overly-colourful cubes of jelly (as in Jell-O) and soggy tinned fruit. This, on the other hand, features lemon curd! And real berries!! And loads of alcohol!!! Besides, you have to respect a dessert that takes two days to make!

Fantastic - thanks for sharing!

this is truly, truly gorgeous!
if this was served at a party I was at, I would eat nothing but this!

this just renders me speechless!
I am English, grew up on trifle. I think (?) we English even invented it.

But yours puts all others to shame, espeically the classic Birds English trifle Mix

Okay, I'm converted!! I've never been a big fan of trifle, but after reading about your trifle, I've changed my mind. As the others have already said,

Wow!

confession: i've never had a trifle in my life. i see them on all the menus here in britain but have never ventured into rodering one. this one looks like it's gonna convert me. next time i find two days of leisure it'll be all mine. btw i love flans, custards etc but have always gone for the easy option: flan with leche nestle (or condensed milk). i promise i won't take the shortcut this time, though, i am inspired!

I'm so glad you all like how it looks. I can promise you it tastes just as wonderful. (Just don't burn the custard!) If you prefer a less dense cake, you can substitute a sponge cake for the pound cake.

Ever since I started making this trife I've been disappointed with restaurant trifles — either they use jello/jelly (yuck!) or they're too plain to be called a trifle.

By the way, the crispy rounded tops of the pound cake that get cut off are wonderful by themselves or served with leftover strawberries and whipped cream for quick strawberry shortcake. Wrap them in foil and they'll keep for several days worth of nibbling.

Good idea for the cake tops, but who would ever have left over strawberries? :^D

I adore pound cake so when we finally get the nerve to make your trifle (do you think it would be safe to halve the recipe? - our glass bowl isn't nearly as large as yours), we will undoubtedly use that. I would think that sponge cake might have a tendency to get mushy.

And I know what you mean about being disappointed in restaurant versions of things. I'm invariably disappointed in black forest cake now.

A long time getting back to this one...

Yes, I think it's safe to halve the recipe. I know some recipes don't halve well, but I don't see anything in the cake, lemon curd, or custard that wouldn't work at half the size. I think you'll have to be more careful about not burning the curd and the custard since there will be less mass to absorb the heat, and remember adjust the baking time for the cake.

Incidentally, if you're coming over to look at the trifle recipe, you should know it has an evil twin:

http://www.kitchenchick.com/2005/01/the_dark_side_o.html

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